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Mount Orégano
Sue Burke
Why Mount Oregano? 
1st-Dec-2006 08:38 pm
Let me see..
The mountain isn't all oregano, as they say here in Spain: No todo el monte es orégano. It means that everything has prickly and stinky patches. You might find some here.

I have a formal website, http://www.sue.burke.name, where you will find more of my writing: the good stuff, fully researched and carefully thought through. Spell-checked, even. Presentable and publishable.

Spontaneous rants, pointless musings, what I ate for lunch, gossip, foolish chatter, and unprofessional conduct does not fit into that site's purpose, which is shameless self-promotion.

Shamelessness for shamelessness's sake brings us here. Welcome.

By the way, proverbs and refrains like motto of this site are an essential part of Spanish culture. (For newcomers: I have lived in Madrid, Spain, for seven years.) Here are some that I did not select for my motto:

When the devil sells his tail, he knows what he's doing. Cuando el diablo su rabo vende, él se entiende. When someone does something that doesn't seem logical, there may be a good reason. The devil, as we know, is very intelligent.

If you don't believe in pain, believe in color. Si no crees en dolor, cree en color. If you don't believe what someone says — that they're sick and in pain, for example — believe what you see — that they're pale and look sick.

God punishes without sticks and stones. Dios paga sin palo ni piedra. At times sinners pay for their sins in unexpected ways.

One bun made from bad dough is enough. De mala masa, un bollo basta. If you have to take or buy something you don't really want, take only the minimum.

Until you get to the tail, everything is bull. Hasta el rabo, todo es toro. Until a project is finished, it always seems like it's going well. Bulls, of course, are noble animals in Spain.

When the cat goes away to pray, the mice will dance. Cuando el gato va a sus devociones, bailan los ratos. When the cat's away, the mice will play. Cats are more religious in Spain, perhaps because they get only seven lives here.
Comments 
2nd-Dec-2006 08:17 pm (UTC)
My favorite is 'So poor they didn't have a corner to die in.' Of course, now I can't remember the Spanish...
3rd-Dec-2006 10:47 am (UTC) - The Spanish
Tan pobre que no tiene ni rincón para morirse. Or something like that. I checked in my refrain dictionaries (essential reference works) and couldn't find it easily, but none of the books pretends to be complete.
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